So What Did We Do? We Made 'Em Even Too Biggier To Fail

So how did America solve the problem of the Too Big To Fail Banks?  Simple, we doubled the size of them.  Now they’re too gigantic to fail.

You couldn’t make this stuff up.

Here’s Stephen Grocer in the WSJ with this incredible story (emphasis Daddy’s):

Citi, BofA, J.P. Morgan and Wells Fargo now control $7.7 trillion in assets and $3.2 trillion in deposits as of March 30. To put that in perspective: The $7.7 trillion in assets is almost double the combined assets of the next 46 biggest banks and 37% more in deposits.

More importantly, those four banks control more assets today than they did in December 2007, when Deal Journal first wrote about “too big to fail.” Back then J.P. Morgan, Citigroup, BofA and Wells held $4.95 trillion in assets.

In the brokerage business, we have a term called Concentrated Position, meaning an account with a greater-than-normal percentage of assets in one or two large holdings.  Accounts with concentrated positions are seen to carry more risk (obviously) and are ineligible for margin privileges in some cases.  Essentially, the entire banking system has become one big concentrated position account, in worse shape than it was in before the crash (thanks to mergers and attrition, no doubt, but still).

This is an interesting solution to the systemic risk problem we were all carrying on about over the last few years.  Bravo.

Source:

Would Washington Let JPM, Citi, B of A or Wells Fail?  (WSJ)

Hat Tip Daniel Hicks (NewsAudit)

Full Disclosure: Nothing on this site should ever be considered to be advice, research or an invitation to buy or sell any securities, please see my Terms & Conditions page for a full disclaimer.