Mauldin on Greece: The Question Now Is Whether Or Not They Run On The Banks

My favorite newsletter writer John Mauldin is out with his latest Thoughts From The Frontline this morning titled This Time Is Different.  It’s packed with great quotes from the book named for that unfortunate maxim by Reinhart and Rogoff.

John gives us some important perspective on the crisis in Greece and a bit of a road map for how these things have played out elsewhere (Mexico, Argentina, Russia etc).  I’ll give you a taste and then send you over to TFTFL for the rest.

This is must-read stuff to understand what’s going on with the Euro and the Dollar, btw…

From Thoughts From The Frontline:

Greeks Bearing Gifts

On Monday, the government of Greece offered a “gift” to the markets of 8 billion euros worth of bonds at a rather high 6.25%. The demand was for 25 billion euros, so this offering was rather robust. Today, those same Greek bonds closed on 6.5%, more than offsetting the first year’s coupon. Greek bond yields are up more than 150 basis points in the last month!

Why such a one-week turnaround? Ambrose Evans Pritchard offers up this thought: “Marc Ostwald, from Monument Securities, said the botched bond issue of €8bn (£6.9bn) of Greek debt earlier this week has made matters worse. Many of the investors were ‘hot money’ funds that bought on rumors that China was emerging as a buyer, offering them a chance for quick profit. When the China story was denied by Beijing and Athens, these funds rushed for the exit.”

Greece is running a budget deficit of 12.5%. Under the Maastricht Treaty, they are supposed to keep it at 3%. Their GDP was $374 billion in 2008 (about €240 billion). If they can cut their budget deficit to 10% this year, that means they will need to go into the bond market for another €25 billion or so. But they already have a problem with rising debt. Look at the following graph on the debt of various countries.

jm012910image001

When Russia defaulted on its debt and sent the world into crisis in 1998, they had total debt of only €51 billion. Greece now has €254 billion and added another €8 billion this week, and needs to add another €24 billion (or so) later this year. That’s a debt-to-GDP ratio of over 100%, well above the limit of the treaty, which is 60%.

Greece benefitted from being in the Eurozone by getting very low interest rates, up until recently. Being in the Eurozone made investors confident. Now that confidence is eroding daily. And this week’s market action says rates will go higher, without some fiscal discipline. To help my US readers put this in perspective, let’s assume that Greece was the size of the US. To get back to Maastricht Treaty levels, they would need to cut the deficit by 4% of GDP for the next few years. If the US did that, it would mean an equivalent budget cut of $500 billion dollars. Per year. For three years running.

Read the rest by signing up (free):

http://www.frontlinethoughts.com/gateway.asp